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Rugby as a sport has traditionally acquired more present of mind and higher levels of participation. Young people and rugby from high school are also growing at a tremendous rate. As the sport grows, it is important that players, parents and coaches less familiar with the game implement some ideas to prevent rugby injuries and keep the sport as safe as possible. One of the best equipment to make own self-safe is rugby pads. 

Players who suffer moderately severe injuries run a greater risk of suffering a subsequent injury in rugby. It is essential that players heal completely of their injuries, recover the full range of movement and strength, and have completed functional training before returning to the field of practice. To prevent rugby injuries you must: Follow the rules of the game and the proper technique. Use the recommended safety equipment as we discussed above “Rugby Pads”.

What are the common rugby injuries? 

Injuries are common during rugby matches. Most injuries occur during tackles and are much more common during games than during training. Common rugby injuries include:

• Sprains in joints and ligaments account of injuries, especially twisted ankles.

• Injuries that hamstring causes the greatest amount of time lost in the game. 

• Bruises and distensions in the knee, ankle, thigh or calf. 

• Fractures, particularly of the clavicle, injuries to the spine, head injuries and concussions are among the most serious, but least common, injuries in rugby.

The incidence of concussion in rugby can be around seven percent, but this number varies widely, and as in many cases, there is concern about the lack of information. It is important to always have qualified medical professionals during matches, and for players who have symptoms of concussion to visit an expert in sports medicine. 

Many are concerned that rugby injuries seem to be increasing professionally, and the fear extends to the young players of the game. 

How to prevent injury in rugby game? 

Other best practices to help reduce your risk of injury include:

• Follow the proper technique to tackle and make side steps.

• Develop a class that includes drills, strength, balance and flexibility.

• Wear protective equipment, such as a harness, rugby pads and mouth guard.

• Use adhesive tape on the ankle for added protection and support

• If you are injured during a game, avoid playing again until you have been authorized by a medical professional. Continuous play will only increase the chances of another injury.

Summary …

Whether you are playing rugby or other game the safety is on first priority. Many types of equipment, methods and techniques can help you to save yourself from the injury.